A Bookaholic, Pro-life, Pro-Family, Pro-Oxford Comma, Catholic (with Asperger's) who reads and writes as her obsession. I've been reading over 400 books a year lately. These are my ramblings on some of the books I read. To read about all the books I read and comment on, visit me at LibraryThing or Goodreads.

I've been blogging since 2007 and at this point (July 2015) am trying my hand at turning the theme of this blog towards mystery, thriller, and crime, fiction and nonfiction. I have some special interest topics and categories within this broad genre which include (but are not limited to) serial killers, scandi-crime, Victorian history and historicals, history of the criminally insane and asylums, psychopathology, death, funerary practices and burial, corpses, true crime and anything dealing with the real life macabre, or that portrayed in fiction.

I also read a short story a day from various collections, sometimes anthologies othertimes collections of a single author's work. These reviews are also posted here and while they are of mixed genre the mystery, thriller, horror, gothic and macabre often appear within their pages as well.

I also blog about
graphic novels and manga on a separate BLOG.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

157. Alexandre Dumas: The Three Musketeers Graphic Novel

Alexandre Dumas: The Three Musketeers by Bruce Buchanan. Illustrated by Amit Tayal (Canada) - (US)
Campfire Classics

Pages: 104
Ages: 12+
Finished: Jul. 17, 2011
First Published: Apr. 26, 2011
Publisher: Campfire
Genre: graphic novel, children, YA, classic
Rating: 4/5

First sentence:

It was the month of April in 1625, in Paris, France.
Acquired: Received a review copy from Steerforth Press.

Reason for Reading:  I am quickly becoming a fan of this publisher, and I love well-done graphic retellings of classics.

I have not read the original "The Three Musketeers", probably because I do not enjoy French literature or historical fiction, especial French Revolution era, but this takes place much earlier than the revolution and while set within the the real time frame of Cardinal Richelieu I was taken with the derring-do and humour of the musketeers.  Not having read the original I don't know whether it is supposed to be humorous but the graphic adaptation certainly was and a splendid story as well.  If this is as well representative of the original as the other "Campfire Classics" I have read then this graphic adaptation has given me a taste and an urge to want to read the original for the first time in my life.  The artwork this time around, compared to the previous "Campfire Classics" I've read is wonderfully original; taking on a cartoonish aspect with overemphasized facial features on all the characters making the simple-minded, heroic and evil apparent just by their looks.  I really enjoy this style of cartooning.  A fun read!

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