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A Bookaholic, Pro-life, Pro-Family, Pro-Oxford Comma, Catholic (with Asperger's) who reads and writes as her obsession. I've been reading over 400 books a year lately. These are my ramblings on some of the books I read. To read about all the books I read and comment on, visit me at LibraryThing or Goodreads.

I've been blogging since 2007 and at this point (July 2015) am trying my hand at turning the theme of this blog towards mystery, thriller, and crime, fiction and nonfiction. I have some special interest topics and categories within this broad genre which include (but are not limited to) serial killers, scandi-crime, Victorian history and historicals, history of the criminally insane and asylums, psychopathology, death, funerary practices and burial, corpses, true crime and anything dealing with the real life macabre, or that portrayed in fiction.

I also read a short story a day from various collections, sometimes anthologies othertimes collections of a single author's work. These reviews are also posted here and while they are of mixed genre the mystery, thriller, horror, gothic and macabre often appear within their pages as well.


I also blog about
graphic novels and manga on a separate BLOG.

Thursday, November 4, 2010

234 & 235. Muppet Graphic Novels

Reason for Reading: These are both Cybils '10 nominees and required reading for me as a graphic novels panelist.

Ages: 8+ (publisher). I think adults will enjoy them more than children.

Publisher: Boom! Studios

Genre: children, graphic novels, fairy tale retelling, humour

234. Muppet Robin Hood by Tim Beedle. Art by Armand Villavert, Jr. (2009), 112 pgs. Take the Robin Hood story, cast it with Muppet characters, keep the basic theme but mix everything else up so it's just plain silly and you have Muppet Robin Hood. Robin (Kermit) returns to find his swamp has been turned into a mini-golf attraction and learns all over England that places have been turned into attractions with admission fees. I found the book aimed at a much higher age than what the publishers suggest simply by it's making fun of itself and its characters. Do today's third graders know who the Swedish Chef is? Janice? Dr. Bunsen Honeydew and Beaker? Do they get the irony of Rowlf the dog playing the part of a wandering minstrel? My ten year old couldn't name a single Muppet except Kermit the Frog and that is because of his occasional appearance on Sesame Street. Anyway, I didn't find the story humorous and got bored halfway through and couldn't wait for it to be over. I will not be reading any Muppet adventures by choice. 1/5

235. Muppet King Arthur by Paul Benjamin & Patrick Storek. Art by Dave Alvarez & James Silvani (2010), 112 pgs. The King Arthur Tale though very skewed does retain its very basic plotline. Kermit is Arthur, he's reluctant to take on the duties of Kingship but does do them with pride. His main enemy is Sam the Eagle who wants to live in a more Republic nation. The Quest for the Holy Grail is the ultimate challenge but when they arrive home he finds his nephew has joined sides with Sam. The humour in this book is most definitely aimed at adults rather than children. There's a joke about having a recount and somebody says oh, no. Don't tell Florida. There is page where the conversation in every balloon manages to incorporate the name of numerous British rock groups from the Beatles to Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin to New Order and Madness. And the humour continues in that vein. I thought this was pretty funny but by the end when they had a pun-off contest I was weary of it. Things I liked: the septagonal table, the repeated appearance of the mnah mnah song guy and Fozzie with his head shaved in a tonsure as Friar Tuck. OK, but I'd only recommend to die-hard Muppet fans. 3/5

1 comment:

  1. I was not a fan of Muppet Robin Hood, I couldn't wait for it to be over. But I did like Muppet Peter Pan.

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