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A Bookaholic, Pro-life, Pro-Family, Pro-Oxford Comma, Catholic (with Asperger's) who reads and writes as her obsession. I've been reading over 400 books a year lately. These are my ramblings on some of the books I read. To read about all the books I read and comment on, visit me at LibraryThing or Goodreads.

I've been blogging since 2007 and at this point (July 2015) am trying my hand at turning the theme of this blog towards mystery, thriller, and crime, fiction and nonfiction. I have some special interest topics and categories within this broad genre which include (but are not limited to) serial killers, scandi-crime, Victorian history and historicals, history of the criminally insane and asylums, psychopathology, death, funerary practices and burial, corpses, true crime and anything dealing with the real life macabre, or that portrayed in fiction.

I also read a short story a day from various collections, sometimes anthologies othertimes collections of a single author's work. These reviews are also posted here and while they are of mixed genre the mystery, thriller, horror, gothic and macabre often appear within their pages as well.


I also blog about
graphic novels and manga on a separate BLOG.

Sunday, February 28, 2010

33. Alexander Graham Bell : An Inventive Life


Alexander Graham Bell: An Inventive Life by Elizabeth MacLeod (Canada) -(US)

Pages: 32 pages
Ages: 8+
Finished: Feb. 25, 2010
First Published: 1999
Genre: children, non-fiction, biography
Rating: 4/5

First sentence:

Next time you pick up the phone to call a friend or order a pizza, say thanks to Alexander Graham Bell.


Acquired: Bought and own a copy.

Reason for Reading: Read aloud to my son as part of our history curriculum.

Comments: This non-fiction book tells the life story of Alexander Graham Bell, skimming the surface of his private life and concentrating on his life as an inventor. Each "chapter" is a two-page spread with one page of text and both pages profusely illustrated with captioned photographs which both illustrate the text and add more information to the text. Written in an engaging style the text is both informative and interesting to read. My son, who currently wants to be an inventor when he grows up, was of course very interested in the book and enjoyed it very much, as did I. I've promised we will take a trip to Brantford this summer to visit the Bell's first home in Canada. For a brief look at Bell's life you couldn't pick a finer book.

Two things did irk me though. One was the use of AGB, for his name after the initial full spelling. Yes, it gets tiring reading the whole name out for an entire book but I would have preferred variations such as Alexander, Bell, Mr. Bell. I substituted the name "Alexander" most of the time I came across AGB and occasionally said the whole name out loud to remind my son of his correct name as I read aloud. The other thing was that the word "deaf" has been replaced by the words "hearing-impaired" except in the name of associations and schools, etc. Deaf is not a bad word and saying someone is "totally hearing-impaired" makes no sense, that's like saying someone is a little bit pregnant. Plus saying that Bell founded an association for the hearing-impaired which *today* is called the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf is taking PC too far. I read the words hearing-impaired a few times when it felt appropriate but mostly I edited and used the word deaf when reading aloud. And just now I've googled it and deaf people actually take offense at being called hearing-impaired! (scroll down to labels)

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