A Bookaholic, Pro-life, Pro-Family, Pro-Oxford Comma, Catholic (with Asperger's) who reads and writes as her obsession. I've been reading over 400 books a year lately. These are my ramblings on some of the books I read. To read about all the books I read and comment on, visit me at LibraryThing or Goodreads.

I've been blogging since 2007 and at this point (July 2015) am trying my hand at turning the theme of this blog towards mystery, thriller, and crime, fiction and nonfiction. I have some special interest topics and categories within this broad genre which include (but are not limited to) serial killers, scandi-crime, Victorian history and historicals, history of the criminally insane and asylums, psychopathology, death, funerary practices and burial, corpses, true crime and anything dealing with the real life macabre, or that portrayed in fiction.

I also read a short story a day from various collections, sometimes anthologies othertimes collections of a single author's work. These reviews are also posted here and while they are of mixed genre the mystery, thriller, horror, gothic and macabre often appear within their pages as well.

I also blog about
graphic novels and manga on a separate BLOG.

Monday, February 2, 2009

22. The Chalk Circle Man

The Chalk Circle Man by Fred Vargas
Translated from the French by Sian Reynolds
The First Adamsberg Novel

Pages: 247
Finished: Feb. 1, 2009
First Published: 1996 (English Translation 2009)Jan 6. UK/Canada,
Genre: crime, mystery
Rating: 5/5

Reason for Reading: Received a Review Copy from Random House Canada.

First sentence:

Mathilde took out her diary and wrote: " The man sitting next to me has got one hell of a nerve."

Comments: Wow! I think I've really been missing something by not reading European crime novels earlier. This is the first in the series of Commissionaire Adamsberg and the latest to be translated into English. While working on and wrapping up another case Adamsberg becomes interested in the latest talk around Paris of mysterious blue chalk circles appearing all over the city several times a week and inside each circle is a common ordinary item, or sometimes just a little strange. They've found a watch, a doll's head, a pen, a dead cat, a pigeon's foot, an 'I Love Elvis' button and many more items. No one except the press is really concerned about this but Adamsberg feels right away that there is something dead wrong about this. And he is proven correct when the first circle to contain a dead body turns up.

Beautifully written, the characters are exquisitely written. In such a short book all the characters, including the secondary ones, are fully developed and real. They are an eccentric bunch of people right from Adamsberg down to the blind man who loves to ask people if they'd like help crossing the street. The crime itself is wonderfully twisty and was impossible for me to figure out. Really an absolutely amazing crime novel crossed with psychological suspense. The characters remind me of Christie and the psychological aspects remind me of Simenon. Brilliance!

Only one thing that bothers me is that the books are not being translated in order. There are already 4 books translated before this, the first one. Strange...

**Sorry about the gushing, but I just really loved this book.


  1. OKAY - you know that this went on my TBR list immediately, don't you!?! :)

  2. hehe, i think this would be right up your alley, joy. Why, oh, why, do i keep discovering new series!?

  3. I was reading the paper yesterday (Sunday Telegraph) and they have a book review section and what do you know. This was one of the books thay had in. It sounds realllly Gooood

  4. I added the link to the ARC Challenge post.

  5. This is my favourite French crime writer at the moment. I also enjoy her stories with the three unemployed university teachers that have decided to share an abandonned house in Paris. I think that the first title of this series is The Three Evangelists.

  6. Oh, thank LN, that series sounds interesting! As soon as I get some spare time I'm definitely going back and reading everything Fred Vargas has written. I still think about this book.