Welcome

A Bookaholic, Pro-life, Pro-Family, Pro-Oxford Comma, Catholic (with Asperger's) who reads and writes as her obsession. I've been reading over 400 books a year lately. These are my ramblings on some of the books I read. To read about all the books I read and comment on, visit me at LibraryThing or Goodreads.

I've been blogging since 2007 and at this point (July 2015) am trying my hand at turning the theme of this blog towards mystery, thriller, and crime, fiction and nonfiction. I have some special interest topics and categories within this broad genre which include (but are not limited to) serial killers, scandi-crime, Victorian history and historicals, history of the criminally insane and asylums, psychopathology, death, funerary practices and burial, corpses, true crime and anything dealing with the real life macabre, or that portrayed in fiction.

I also read a short story a day from various collections, sometimes anthologies othertimes collections of a single author's work. These reviews are also posted here and while they are of mixed genre the mystery, thriller, horror, gothic and macabre often appear within their pages as well.


I also blog about
graphic novels and manga on a separate BLOG.

Saturday, September 6, 2008

OT: Politics

I will be talking politics occasionally over the next couple of months as we are about to have an election here in Canada soon. So I'm just giving the word up that if you are left-wing you'll probably just want to skip these posts.

I watched McCain's acceptance speech the other night and was just blown away with it. What an amazing man, with such character and vision. I found myself clapping when he talked about education.

I'm not what you could particularly call a politically minded person and I could easily get in over my head but I do know what I believe in.

I asked my husband why we couldn't have politicians here in Canada who make speeches like that and he said because they would be ridiculed. There is no way a Canadian politician could talk about being a war hero or talk about patriotism. If you are a patriotic Canadian then people automatically assume you're a redneck.

Our greatest Canadian patriot is Don Cherry, a hockey commentator, and the 'elite' of Canada (ie.left-wing liberal media) make fun of him because he is so patriotic.

Hopefully, Harper will win a majority government this time around and Canada can continue to regain respect worldwide since he has put money into our previous shambles of a military. I know of what I speak, being an army wife in my younger days.

5 comments:

  1. Nicola: I found your post very intriguing, especially about showing patriotism/veteran activities in your country.

    I like to think that most Americans, no matter their party affiliation, are respectful of our U.S. veterans. I am married to a Gulf War veteran, and when he wears his Marine Corps or Veterans shirt, most people say something nice to him.

    I don't like to talk politics or express my views about either candidate publicly, but I do have a lot of respect for Senator McCain's military service. He has certainly gone above and beyond in terms of his service.

    Have a great Sunday!
    Jill

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  2. *Sigh* When I was up in Toronto a few weeks ago, I heard enough McCain/Bush/USA bashing to last me a lifetime. :( From what it sounded like a lot of Canadians are really for Obama. It will definitely be an interesting race. I think that Palin has put a lot of energy back into the party as well.

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  3. Yes, Trish, Toronto & Ontario in general (where I do live) are the US bashers of Canada. Now I'm sure to get flamed for saying that. But I used to live in Alberta which is very, very conservative (ie. Republican) and we love our southern neighbours there.

    One thing that should never be said when speaking of Canadians is using the word Canadian as each province is as different as chalk and cheese.

    You experience with "Ontarians" is completely different from what you would experience from "Albertans" or "Manitobans", etc.

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  4. Interesting! My dad is Ontarian :) and he's never mentioned the distinction before. I'm gonna have to have a chat with him! Of course each province is different--just as each state is different. But I'm not entirely sure most I think of myself as Texan first and American second (although a lot of Texans would disagree with me!).

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  5. Very interesting Trish! I lived in Ontario as a child but moved to Alberta when I got married and most definately considered myself as an Albertan way before a Canadian, as did a lot of our aquaintences.

    Now that I'm back in Ontario. I like it here and it feels more like home but I still feel a bit like a transplanted Albertan.

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